Wimbledon Station Is Officially Overcrowded

Action is neded to ease passenger congestion

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Wimbledon station is one of 11 UK stations named as most in need of action against overcrowding.

Network Rail has said action must be taken to relieve passenger congestion at Wimbledon by 2019.

The list of 11 stations also included Clapham Junction, Surbiton and the central London stations of Victoria, Fenchurch Street and Charing Cross.

The list excluded stations where congestion-busting measures are already in place such as Paddington and Farringdon in London.

The report suggested various measures to ease congestion, ranging from "soft" options, such as encouraging more print-at-home ticketing or relocating information points, to more expensive options involving provision of additional space.

Network Rail's group strategy director Paul Plummer said: "A successful railway station should add to the passenger experience as well as support the economic, social and environmental benefits of rail.

"As more and more people choose to travel by rail, it's vital that passenger congestion is tackled or some stations risk becoming victims of their own success.

"Working with our partners from across the rail industry, we have identified a number of stations that would benefit from cost-effective measures to reduce congestion and improve the travelling experience for passengers."

Richard Tracey, London Assembly Member for Wandsworth & Merton, said: "I have been fighting a long campaign to improve conditions at local stations, especially Clapham Junction and Wimbledon, together with my MP colleagues, and have regular contact with Transport ministers and Network Rail, as well as making a documentary about the problem with ITV.

"There are other stations that should be on the list such as Wandsworth Town and Earlsfield. Plus we need longer trains and the mothballed Waterloo International platforms back in use".

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September 1, 2011